Coverart for item
The Resource Building the Internet of Things with IPv6 and MIPv6 : the Evolving World of M2M Communications

Building the Internet of Things with IPv6 and MIPv6 : the Evolving World of M2M Communications

Label
Building the Internet of Things with IPv6 and MIPv6 : the Evolving World of M2M Communications
Title
Building the Internet of Things with IPv6 and MIPv6
Title remainder
the Evolving World of M2M Communications
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
If we had computers that knew everything there was to know about things-using data they gathered without any help from us-we would be able to track and count everything, and greatly reduce waste, loss, and cost. We would know when things needed replacing, repairing or recalling, and whether they were fresh or past their best. The Internet of Things has the potential to change the world, just as the Internet did. Maybe even more so.--Kevin Ashton, originator of the term, Internet of Things An examination of the concept and unimagined potential unleashed by the Internet of Thi
Cataloging source
IDEBK
Dewey number
004.62
Index
index present
LC call number
TK
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Label
Building the Internet of Things with IPv6 and MIPv6 : the Evolving World of M2M Communications
Link
https://www.lib.byu.edu/cgi-bin/remoteauth.pl?url=http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/book/10.1002/9781118647059
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1.1. Overview and Motivations -- 1.2. Examples of Applications -- 1.3. IPv6 Role -- 1.4. Areas of Development and Standardization -- 1.5. Scope of the Present Investigation -- Appendix 1.A: Some Related Literature -- References -- 2.1. IoT Definitions -- 2.1.1. General Observations -- 2.1.2. ITU-T views -- 2.1.3. Working Definition -- 2.2. IoT Frameworks -- 2.3. Basic Nodal Capabilities -- References -- 3.1. Overview -- 3.2. Smart Metering/Advanced Metering Infrastructure -- 3.3.e-HealthBody Area Networks -- 3.4. City Automation -- 3.5. Automotive Applications -- 3.6. Home Automation -- 3.7. Smart Cards -- 3.8. Tracking (Following and Monitoring Mobile Objects) -- 3.9. Over-The-Air-Passive Surveillance/Ring of Steel -- 3.10. Control Application Examples -- 3.11. Myriad Other Applications -- References -- 4.1. Identification of IoT Objects and Services -- 4.2. Structural Aspects of the IoT -- 4.2.1. Environment Characteristics -- 4.2.2. Traffic Characteristics
  • 4.2.3. Scalability -- 4.2.4. Interoperability -- 4.2.5. Security and Privacy -- 4.2.6. Open Architecture -- 4.3. Key IoT Technologies -- 4.3.1. Device Intelligence -- 4.3.2.Communication Capabilities -- 4.3.3. Mobility Support -- 4.3.4. Device Power -- 4.3.5. Sensor Technology -- 4.3.6. RFID Technology -- 4.3.7. Satellite Technology -- References -- 5.1. Overview and Approaches -- 5.2. IETF IPv6 Routing Protocol for RPL Roll -- 5.3. Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) -- 5.3.1. Background -- 5.3.2. Messaging Model -- 5.3.3. Request/Response Model -- 5.3.4. Intermediaries and Caching -- 5.4. Representational State Transfer (REST) -- 5.5. ETSI M2M -- 5.6. Third-Generation Partnership Project Service Requirements for Machine-Type Communications -- 5.6.1. Approach -- 5.6.2. Architectural Reference Model for MTC -- 5.7. CENELEC -- 5.8. IETF IPv6 Over Lowpower WPAN (6LoWPAN) -- 5.9. ZigBee IP (ZIP) -- 5.10. IP in Smart Objects (IPSO)
  • Appendix 5.A: Legacy Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems -- References -- 6.1. WPAN Technologies for IoT/M2M -- 6.1.1. Zigbee/IEEE 802.15.4 -- 6.1.2. Radio Frequency for Consumer Electronics (RF4CE) -- 6.1.3. Bluetooth and its Low-Energy Profile -- 6.1.4. IEEE 802.15.6 WBANs -- 6.1.5. IEEE 802.15 WPAN TG4j MBANs -- 6.1.6. ETSI TR 101 557 -- 6.1.7. NFC -- 6.1.8. Dedicated Short-Range Communications (DSRC) and Related Protocols -- 6.1.9.Comparison of WPAN Technologies -- 6.2. Cellular and Mobile Network Technologies for IoT/M2M -- 6.2.1. Overview and Motivations -- 6.2.2. Universal Mobile Telecommunications System -- 6.2.3. LTE -- Appendix 6.A: Non-Wireless Technologies for IoT: Powerline Communications -- References -- 7.1. Overview and Motivations -- 7.2. Address Capabilities -- 7.2.1. IPv4 Addressing and Issues -- 7.2.2. IPv6 Address Space -- 7.3. IPv6 Protocol Overview -- 7.4. IPv6 Tunneling -- 7.5. IPsec in IPv6 -- 7.6. Header Compression Schemes
  • 7.7. Quality of Service in IPv6 -- 7.8. Migration Strategies to IPv6 -- 7.8.1. Technical Approaches -- 7.8.2. Residential Broadband Services in an IPv6 Environment -- 7.8.3. Deployment Opportunities -- References -- 8.1. Overview -- 8.2. Protocol Details -- 8.2.1. Generic Mechanisms -- 8.2.2. New IPv6 Protocol, Message Types, and Destination Option -- 8.2.3. Modifications to IPv6 Neighbor Discovery -- 8.2.4. Requirements for Various IPv6 Nodes -- 8.2.5. Correspondent Node Operation -- 8.2.6. HA Node Operation -- 8.2.7. Mobile Node Operation -- 8.2.8. Relationship to IPV4 Mobile IPv4 (MIP) -- References -- 9.1. Background/Introduction -- 9.2.6LoWPANs Goals -- 9.3. Transmission of IPv6 Packets Over IEEE 802.15.4 -- References
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781118473474
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Note
  • John Wiley and Sons
  • ProQuest ebrary
Publisher number
EB00064029
Specific material designation
remote
Stock number
499134
System control number
(OCoLC)851158445
Label
Building the Internet of Things with IPv6 and MIPv6 : the Evolving World of M2M Communications
Link
https://www.lib.byu.edu/cgi-bin/remoteauth.pl?url=http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/book/10.1002/9781118647059
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1.1. Overview and Motivations -- 1.2. Examples of Applications -- 1.3. IPv6 Role -- 1.4. Areas of Development and Standardization -- 1.5. Scope of the Present Investigation -- Appendix 1.A: Some Related Literature -- References -- 2.1. IoT Definitions -- 2.1.1. General Observations -- 2.1.2. ITU-T views -- 2.1.3. Working Definition -- 2.2. IoT Frameworks -- 2.3. Basic Nodal Capabilities -- References -- 3.1. Overview -- 3.2. Smart Metering/Advanced Metering Infrastructure -- 3.3.e-HealthBody Area Networks -- 3.4. City Automation -- 3.5. Automotive Applications -- 3.6. Home Automation -- 3.7. Smart Cards -- 3.8. Tracking (Following and Monitoring Mobile Objects) -- 3.9. Over-The-Air-Passive Surveillance/Ring of Steel -- 3.10. Control Application Examples -- 3.11. Myriad Other Applications -- References -- 4.1. Identification of IoT Objects and Services -- 4.2. Structural Aspects of the IoT -- 4.2.1. Environment Characteristics -- 4.2.2. Traffic Characteristics
  • 4.2.3. Scalability -- 4.2.4. Interoperability -- 4.2.5. Security and Privacy -- 4.2.6. Open Architecture -- 4.3. Key IoT Technologies -- 4.3.1. Device Intelligence -- 4.3.2.Communication Capabilities -- 4.3.3. Mobility Support -- 4.3.4. Device Power -- 4.3.5. Sensor Technology -- 4.3.6. RFID Technology -- 4.3.7. Satellite Technology -- References -- 5.1. Overview and Approaches -- 5.2. IETF IPv6 Routing Protocol for RPL Roll -- 5.3. Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP) -- 5.3.1. Background -- 5.3.2. Messaging Model -- 5.3.3. Request/Response Model -- 5.3.4. Intermediaries and Caching -- 5.4. Representational State Transfer (REST) -- 5.5. ETSI M2M -- 5.6. Third-Generation Partnership Project Service Requirements for Machine-Type Communications -- 5.6.1. Approach -- 5.6.2. Architectural Reference Model for MTC -- 5.7. CENELEC -- 5.8. IETF IPv6 Over Lowpower WPAN (6LoWPAN) -- 5.9. ZigBee IP (ZIP) -- 5.10. IP in Smart Objects (IPSO)
  • Appendix 5.A: Legacy Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems -- References -- 6.1. WPAN Technologies for IoT/M2M -- 6.1.1. Zigbee/IEEE 802.15.4 -- 6.1.2. Radio Frequency for Consumer Electronics (RF4CE) -- 6.1.3. Bluetooth and its Low-Energy Profile -- 6.1.4. IEEE 802.15.6 WBANs -- 6.1.5. IEEE 802.15 WPAN TG4j MBANs -- 6.1.6. ETSI TR 101 557 -- 6.1.7. NFC -- 6.1.8. Dedicated Short-Range Communications (DSRC) and Related Protocols -- 6.1.9.Comparison of WPAN Technologies -- 6.2. Cellular and Mobile Network Technologies for IoT/M2M -- 6.2.1. Overview and Motivations -- 6.2.2. Universal Mobile Telecommunications System -- 6.2.3. LTE -- Appendix 6.A: Non-Wireless Technologies for IoT: Powerline Communications -- References -- 7.1. Overview and Motivations -- 7.2. Address Capabilities -- 7.2.1. IPv4 Addressing and Issues -- 7.2.2. IPv6 Address Space -- 7.3. IPv6 Protocol Overview -- 7.4. IPv6 Tunneling -- 7.5. IPsec in IPv6 -- 7.6. Header Compression Schemes
  • 7.7. Quality of Service in IPv6 -- 7.8. Migration Strategies to IPv6 -- 7.8.1. Technical Approaches -- 7.8.2. Residential Broadband Services in an IPv6 Environment -- 7.8.3. Deployment Opportunities -- References -- 8.1. Overview -- 8.2. Protocol Details -- 8.2.1. Generic Mechanisms -- 8.2.2. New IPv6 Protocol, Message Types, and Destination Option -- 8.2.3. Modifications to IPv6 Neighbor Discovery -- 8.2.4. Requirements for Various IPv6 Nodes -- 8.2.5. Correspondent Node Operation -- 8.2.6. HA Node Operation -- 8.2.7. Mobile Node Operation -- 8.2.8. Relationship to IPV4 Mobile IPv4 (MIP) -- References -- 9.1. Background/Introduction -- 9.2.6LoWPANs Goals -- 9.3. Transmission of IPv6 Packets Over IEEE 802.15.4 -- References
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781118473474
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Note
  • John Wiley and Sons
  • ProQuest ebrary
Publisher number
EB00064029
Specific material designation
remote
Stock number
499134
System control number
(OCoLC)851158445

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