Coverart for item
The Resource Individualism, collectivism, and high self-esteem, by Brett M. Breton

Individualism, collectivism, and high self-esteem, by Brett M. Breton

Label
Individualism, collectivism, and high self-esteem
Title
Individualism, collectivism, and high self-esteem
Statement of responsibility
by Brett M. Breton
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • Self-Esteem seems to be a widely used and very popular construct, particularly in individualist societies, such as the United States. It also seems that, for many, self-esteem has significance for motivation and life satisfaction. Indeed, self-esteem is often seen as a crucial factor in relation to success and happiness. Self-esteem is often regarded as something that exists everywhere. This study aimed at analyzing the construct of self-esteem from a cultural perspective. That is, the goal was to explore perspectives, mainly what high self-esteem, or the characteristics often associated with high self-esteem might "look like" viewed through different cultural lenses. It was hypothesized that people from collectivist societies or adhering to traditional collectivist values would view the characteristics associated with high self-esteem in a different fashion than those with relatively more individualist values. Participants were recruited from four universities, Brigham Young University, Utah Valley State College, University of Texas at Brownsville, and the National Autonomous University of Mexico in Mexico City, both Anglos/Whites and Hispanics/Latinos. There were 343 participants, 171 Females and 172 males; 147 participants reported Anglo as their ethnicity and 196 reported Hispanic. Participants were divided by their responses in an Individualism/Collectivism scale by median split. Employing two well know self-esteem instruements (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory) four profiles were created; two representing high self-esteem and two low self-esteem. Participants reviewed the profiles and were instructed to form a mental image of the individual who ostensibly responded to the inventory. Then participants rated the person on 22-item adjective scales. Two 3-WAY MANOVAs were performed, which yielded results showing that Individualism and Collectivism were important factors in rating the profiles. High self-esteem profiles were rated differently by those participants reporting collectivist values than those relatively more individualist values. Apparently, for the former group, the characteristics often associated with high self-esteem were seen as less desirable, perhaps due to their potential to disrupt group harmony and relationships, which are important values of collectivism
  • One important and surprising finding was the fact that more Hispanic participants gave individualist scores and more Anglos gave more collectivist scores. This is surprising due to the fact that the relevant research (e.g. Hofstede; Triandis, etc.) indicates that Hispanics tend to be more collectivist and Anglos from the United States tend to be more individualist. In spite of this important and surprising finding, Individualism and collectivism remained important variables in terms of differences in perception and rating of profiles representing high self-esteem
Cataloging source
UPB
Degree
Ph. D.
Dissertation year
2007
Granting institution
Brigham Young University. Dept. of Psychology
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • bibliography
  • theses
Label
Individualism, collectivism, and high self-esteem, by Brett M. Breton
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 78-88)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
28 cm.
Extent
iii, 120, [2] leaves
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
col. ill.
System control number
  • UtOrBLW
  • (OCoLC)ocn376829306
Label
Individualism, collectivism, and high self-esteem, by Brett M. Breton
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 78-88)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
28 cm.
Extent
iii, 120, [2] leaves
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Other physical details
col. ill.
System control number
  • UtOrBLW
  • (OCoLC)ocn376829306

Library Locations

    • Harold B. Lee Library Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 84602, US
      40.249156 -111.649242
    • BYU-SPECIAL-COLLECTIONSBorrow it
      UT, US
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