Coverart for item
The Resource Online panel research : a data quality perspective, edited by Mario Callegaro, Reg Baker, Jelke Bethlehem, Anja Goritz, Jon A. Krosnick, Paul J. Lavrakas

Online panel research : a data quality perspective, edited by Mario Callegaro, Reg Baker, Jelke Bethlehem, Anja Goritz, Jon A. Krosnick, Paul J. Lavrakas

Label
Online panel research : a data quality perspective
Title
Online panel research
Title remainder
a data quality perspective
Statement of responsibility
edited by Mario Callegaro, Reg Baker, Jelke Bethlehem, Anja Goritz, Jon A. Krosnick, Paul J. Lavrakas
Contributor
Editor of compilation
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Provides new insights into the accuracy and value of online panels for completing surveys Over the last decade, there has been a major global shift in survey and market research towards data collection, using samples selected from online panels. Yet despite their widespread use, remarkably little is known about the quality of the resulting data. This edited volume is one of the first attempts to carefully examine the quality of the survey data being generated by online samples. It describes some of the best empirically-based research on what has become a very important yet controversial met
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
001.4/33
Index
index present
LC call number
H61.26
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Wiley series in survey methodology
Label
Online panel research : a data quality perspective, edited by Mario Callegaro, Reg Baker, Jelke Bethlehem, Anja Goritz, Jon A. Krosnick, Paul J. Lavrakas
Link
https://www.lib.byu.edu/cgi-bin/remoteauth.pl?url=http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/book/10.1002/9781118763520
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Wiley Series in Survey Methodology; Title Page; Copyright; Preface; Content of the book; References; Acknowledgments; Companion datasets and book format; References; About the Editors; About the Contributors; Chapter 1: Online panel research: History, concepts, applications and a look at the future; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Internet penetration and online panels; 1.3 Definitions and terminology; 1.4 A brief history of online panels; 1.5 Development and maintenance of online panels; 1.6 Types of studies for which online panels are used
  • 1.7 Industry standards, professional associations' guidelines, and advisory groups1.8 Data quality issues; 1.9 Looking ahead to the future of online panels; References; Chapter 2: A critical review of studies investigating the quality of data obtained with online panels based on probability and nonprobability samples; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Taxonomy of comparison studies; 2.3 Accuracy metrics; 2.4 Large-scale experiments on point estimates; 2.5 Weighting adjustments; 2.6 Predictive relationship studies; 2.7 Experiment replicability studies; 2.8 The special case of pre-election polls
  • 2.9 Completion rates and accuracy2.10 Multiple panel membership; 2.11 Online panel studies when the offline population is less of a concern; 2.12 Life of an online panel member; 2.13 Summary and conclusion; References; Part I: Coverage; Introduction to Part I; I.1 Coverage bias in online panels; I.2 The chapters in Part I; References; Chapter 3: Assessing representativeness of a probability-based online panel in Germany; 3.1 Probability-based online panels; 3.2 Description of the GESIS Online Panel Pilot; 3.3 Assessing recruitment of the Online Panel Pilot
  • 3.4 Assessing data quality: Comparison with external data3.5 Results; 3.6 Discussion and conclusion; References; Appendix 3.A; Chapter 4: Online panels and validity: Representativeness and attrition in the Finnish eOpinion panel; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Online panels: Overview of methodological considerations; 4.3 Design and research questions; 4.4 Data and methods; 4.5 Findings; 4.6 Conclusion; References; Chapter 5: The untold story of multi-mode (online and mail) consumer panels1: From optimal recruitment to retention and attrition; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Literature review; 5.3 Methods
  • 5.4 Results5.5 Discussion and conclusion; References; Part II: Nonresponse; Introduction to Part II; II.1 The nonresponse problem; II.2 The nonresponse bias; II.3 Exploring nonresponse; II.4 The chapters in Part II; References; Chapter 6: Nonresponse and attrition in a probability-based online panel for the general population; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Attrition in online panels versus offline panels; 6.3 The LISS panel; 6.4 Attrition modeling and results; 6.5 Comparison of attrition and nonresponse bias; 6.6 Discussion and conclusion; References
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781118763520
Lccn
2014000677
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Note
  • John Wiley and Sons
  • ProQuest ebrary
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)867852780
Label
Online panel research : a data quality perspective, edited by Mario Callegaro, Reg Baker, Jelke Bethlehem, Anja Goritz, Jon A. Krosnick, Paul J. Lavrakas
Link
https://www.lib.byu.edu/cgi-bin/remoteauth.pl?url=http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/book/10.1002/9781118763520
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Wiley Series in Survey Methodology; Title Page; Copyright; Preface; Content of the book; References; Acknowledgments; Companion datasets and book format; References; About the Editors; About the Contributors; Chapter 1: Online panel research: History, concepts, applications and a look at the future; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Internet penetration and online panels; 1.3 Definitions and terminology; 1.4 A brief history of online panels; 1.5 Development and maintenance of online panels; 1.6 Types of studies for which online panels are used
  • 1.7 Industry standards, professional associations' guidelines, and advisory groups1.8 Data quality issues; 1.9 Looking ahead to the future of online panels; References; Chapter 2: A critical review of studies investigating the quality of data obtained with online panels based on probability and nonprobability samples; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Taxonomy of comparison studies; 2.3 Accuracy metrics; 2.4 Large-scale experiments on point estimates; 2.5 Weighting adjustments; 2.6 Predictive relationship studies; 2.7 Experiment replicability studies; 2.8 The special case of pre-election polls
  • 2.9 Completion rates and accuracy2.10 Multiple panel membership; 2.11 Online panel studies when the offline population is less of a concern; 2.12 Life of an online panel member; 2.13 Summary and conclusion; References; Part I: Coverage; Introduction to Part I; I.1 Coverage bias in online panels; I.2 The chapters in Part I; References; Chapter 3: Assessing representativeness of a probability-based online panel in Germany; 3.1 Probability-based online panels; 3.2 Description of the GESIS Online Panel Pilot; 3.3 Assessing recruitment of the Online Panel Pilot
  • 3.4 Assessing data quality: Comparison with external data3.5 Results; 3.6 Discussion and conclusion; References; Appendix 3.A; Chapter 4: Online panels and validity: Representativeness and attrition in the Finnish eOpinion panel; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Online panels: Overview of methodological considerations; 4.3 Design and research questions; 4.4 Data and methods; 4.5 Findings; 4.6 Conclusion; References; Chapter 5: The untold story of multi-mode (online and mail) consumer panels1: From optimal recruitment to retention and attrition; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Literature review; 5.3 Methods
  • 5.4 Results5.5 Discussion and conclusion; References; Part II: Nonresponse; Introduction to Part II; II.1 The nonresponse problem; II.2 The nonresponse bias; II.3 Exploring nonresponse; II.4 The chapters in Part II; References; Chapter 6: Nonresponse and attrition in a probability-based online panel for the general population; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Attrition in online panels versus offline panels; 6.3 The LISS panel; 6.4 Attrition modeling and results; 6.5 Comparison of attrition and nonresponse bias; 6.6 Discussion and conclusion; References
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781118763520
Lccn
2014000677
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Note
  • John Wiley and Sons
  • ProQuest ebrary
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)867852780

Library Locations

Processing Feedback ...