Coverart for item
The Resource Post-fire treatment effectiveness for hillslope stabilization, Peter R. Robichaud, Louise E. Ashmun, and Bruce D. Sims

Post-fire treatment effectiveness for hillslope stabilization, Peter R. Robichaud, Louise E. Ashmun, and Bruce D. Sims

Label
Post-fire treatment effectiveness for hillslope stabilization
Title
Post-fire treatment effectiveness for hillslope stabilization
Statement of responsibility
Peter R. Robichaud, Louise E. Ashmun, and Bruce D. Sims
Title variation
Postfire treatment effectiveness for hillslope stabilization
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This synthesis of post-fire treatment effectiveness reviews the past decade of research, monitoring, and product development related to post-fire hillslope emergency stabilization treatments, including erosion barriers, mulching, chemical soil treatments, and combinations of these treatments. In the past ten years, erosion barrier treatments (contour-felled logs and straw wattles) have declined in use and are now rarely applied as a post-fire hillslope treatment. In contrast, dry mulch treatments (agricultural straw, wood strands, wood shreds, etc.) have quickly gained acceptance as effective, though somewhat expensive, post-fire hillslope stabilization treatments and are frequently recommended when values-at-risk warrant protection. This change has been motivated by research that shows the proportion of exposed mineral soil (or conversely, the proportion of ground cover) to be the primary treatment factor controlling post-fire hillslope erosion. Erosion barrier treatments provide little ground cover and have been shown to be less effective than mulch, especially during short-duration, high intensity rainfall events. In addition, innovative options for producing and applying mulch materials have adapted these materials for use on large burned areas that are inaccessible by road. Although longer-term studies on mulch treatment effectiveness are on-going, early results and short-term studies have shown that dry mulches can be highly effective in reducing post-fire runoff and erosion. Hydromulches have been used after some fires, but they have been less effective than dry mulches in stabilizing burned hillslopes and generally decompose or degrade within a year
Member of
Additional physical form
Available also on the Internet.
Cataloging source
MNU
Government publication
federal national government publication
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • maps
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
NAL call number
aSD387.F52
NAL item number
R62 2010
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
General technical report RMRS-GTR
Series volume
240
Label
Post-fire treatment effectiveness for hillslope stabilization, Peter R. Robichaud, Louise E. Ashmun, and Bruce D. Sims
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Cover title
  • "August 2010."
  • Format not distributed to depository libraries
  • "Funded by the Joint Fire Sciences Program"--P. [2] of cover
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 33-37)
Color
multicolored
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
online resource (iii, 62 p.)
Other physical details
ill. (some col.), col. map
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (OCoLC)ocn681492168
  • (OCoLC)ocn793731864
Label
Post-fire treatment effectiveness for hillslope stabilization, Peter R. Robichaud, Louise E. Ashmun, and Bruce D. Sims
Link
Publication
Note
  • Cover title
  • "August 2010."
  • Format not distributed to depository libraries
  • "Funded by the Joint Fire Sciences Program"--P. [2] of cover
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (p. 33-37)
Color
multicolored
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
online resource (iii, 62 p.)
Other physical details
ill. (some col.), col. map
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
  • (OCoLC)ocn681492168
  • (OCoLC)ocn793731864

Library Locations

    • Harold B. Lee Library Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 84602, US
      40.249156 -111.649242
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