Context

Context of The magus : or Celestial intelligencer; being a complete system of occult philosophy. In three books: containing the ancient and modern practice of the cabalistic art, natural and celestial magic, &c.; shewing the wonderful effects that may be performed by a knowledge of the celestial influences, the occult properties of metals, herbs, and stones, and the application of active to passive principles exhibiting the sciences of natural magic; alchymy, or hermetic philosophy; and also the nature, creation, and fall of man; his natural and supernatural gifts; the magical power inherent in the soul, &c.; with a great variety of experiments in natural magic: the constellatory practice, or talismanic magic; the nature of the elements, stars, planets, signs, &c.; the construction and composition of all sorts of magic seals, images, rings, glasses, &c.; the virtue and efficacy of numbers, characters, and figures, of good and evil spirits. Magnetism, and cabalistical or ceremonial magic; in which the secret mysteries of the Cabala are explained; the operations of good and evil spirits; all kinds of cabalistic figures, tables, seals, and names, with their use, &c. The times, bonds, offices, and conjuration of spirits. To whic is added Biographia antiqua, or The lives of the most eminent philosophers, maji, &c. The who illustrated with a great variety of curious engravings, magical and cabalistical figures, &c.
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